Queen Mary University of London, Engage Watermark Survey 2020

Queen Mary University of London

sophie.duncan@uwe.ac.uk

university

faculties

a

Queen Mary

faculties

Introduction

[institution_prefix_cap] [institution] has applied for a Public Engagement Watermark.

Acting in a similar way to a chartermark - the watermark is an award granted to institutions, faculties or research centres for strategic support for public engagement, and a commitment to improve the support offered by the institution. Just as a watermark runs through the fabric of a document, the watermark indicates that engagement runs through the fabric of the institution.

We would be grateful if you would complete the following survey to share how well you think [institution_prefix_low] [institution] supports public engagement. The survey will take around 15 minutes to complete (or longer if you choose to provide more detailed feedback). You will need to complete the survey in one go as you are unable to save your answers before they are submitted. The results of this survey will be synthesised and considered alongside the other sources of evidence. This will inform the level of award granted to your institution, as well as providing useful intelligence to improve your institution's support for public engagement.

Data Protection and Consent

Please read carefully before continuing.

In order to receive your survey response, the NCCPE requires your consent for us to process your personal data. If you choose to give your name or contact details these will only be available to the NCCPE research team. Information you give will be treated as strictly confidential and handled in accordance with the provisions of the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR).

The information you submit will be published as part of a report, but confidentiality and anonymity will be maintained and no individual will be identifiable from any publications. By consenting, you agree that your non-personal research data may be used by others for future research. You are assured that the confidentiality of your personal data will be upheld through the removal of any identifiers.

Please see our Privacy Notice for further information on how your personal data will be processed.

I understand that my personal information will:

  • Only be shared without my permission when required or permitted by law, for example if there is a serious risk of harm to me or others;
  • Be kept for up to ten years.

Once given, you can withdraw your consent at any time by contacting nccpe.enquiries@uwe.ac.uk. All personal data is processed in accordance with the applicable UK data protection legislation. The joint Data Controllers are UWE Bristol and University of Bristol. For data protection queries, please write to dataprotection@uwe.ac.uk

1

Information about you

Providing your name and contact details is optional, but enables the researcher to contact you if they have any questions arising from the information you have submitted. It also helps us to cross reference data the next time [institution_prefix_low] [institution] run this survey. Please note, as stated on the previous page, no identifying data will be shared with [institution_prefix_low] [institution] and your personal data will be processed in accordance with our Privacy Notice.

12345Don't knowN/A
a) Grant/funding applications?
b) Knowledge transfer and commercialisation activities?
c) Managing budgets/resources?
d) Peer reviewing?
e) Publications?
f) Public engagement with research?
g) Supervising/managing staff?
h) Supervising research students?
i) Teaching and lecturing?

2

Public Engagement

3

The Edge Tool

The NCCPE has created the EDGE tool which enables people to reflect on how their institution, school, faculty or research centre supports public engagement. There are three sections to the assessment looking at purpose, process and people. We invite you to assess [institution_prefix_low] [institution] using the EDGE tool. We encourage you to select an option from those offered, and only to choose 'don't know' if you really feel you cannot comment at all. You are invited to add additional comments in the boxes provided.

The following questions relate to section 1: Purpose

Dont Know

Don't know

Embryonic

There is little or no reference to public engagement in the [institution_type] mission or in other [institution_type]-wide strategies

Developing

Public engagement is referenced sporadically within the [institution_type]'s mission documents and strategies, but is not considered a priority area

Gripping

Public engagement is clearly referenced within the [institution_type]'s mission and strategies and the [institution_type] is developing an [institution_type]-wide strategic approach

Embedding

Public engagement is prioritised in the [institution_type]'s official mission and in other key strategies, with success indicators identified. It is a key consideration in strategic developments in the [institution_type].

Dont Know

Don't know

Embryonic

Few (if any) of the most influential leaders in the [institution_type] serve as champions for public engagement

Developing

Some of the [institution_type]'s senior team act as informal champions for public engagement

Gripping

Some of the [institution_type]'s senior team act as formal champions for public engagement

Embedding

The [institution_type]'s leader acts as a champion for public engagement and a senior leader takes formal responsibility. All senior leaders have an understanding of the importance and value of public engagement to the [institution_type]'s agenda

Dont Know

Don't know

Embryonic

The [institution_type]'s commitment to public engagement is rarely if ever featured in internal or external communications

Developing

Public engagement occasionally features in internal and external communications

Gripping

Public engagement frequently features in internal communications, but rarely as a high profile item or with an emphasis on its strategic importance

Embedding

Public engagement appears prominently in the [institution_type]'s internal communications; its strategic importance is highlighted, and resources and strategic support have been allocated to sustain this

The following questions relate to section 2: Process

Dont Know

Don't know

Embryonic

There is no attempt to coordinate public engagement activity or to network learning and expertise across the [institution_type]

Developing

There are some informal attempts to coordinate public engagement activities, but there is no strategic plan for this work. Some self-forming networks exist, not supported by the [institution_type]

Gripping

Oversight and co-ordination of public engagement has been formally allocated (e.g. to a working group or committee) but there is minimal support and resource to invest in activity

Embedding

The [institution_type] has a strategic plan to focus its co-ordination, a body/ies with formal responsibility for oversight of this plan, and resources available to assist the embedding of public engagement. There are a number of recognised and supported networks

Dont Know

Don't know

Embryonic

There is little or no opportunity for staff or students to access professional development to develop their skills & knowledge of public engagement

Developing

There are some opportunities for staff or students to access professional development and training in public engagement, but no formal or systematic support

Gripping

There are some formal opportunities for staff or students to access professional development and training in public engagement

Embedding

Staff and students are encouraged and supported in accessing professional development, training and informal learning to develop their skills and knowledge of engagement

Dont Know

Don't know

Embryonic

Staff are not formally rewarded or recognised for their public engagement activities

Developing

Some departments recognise and reward public engagement activity on an ad hoc basis.

Gripping

The [institution_type] is working towards [institution_type_prefix] [institution_type]-wide policy for recognising and rewarding public engagement activity (e.g through awards, appraisal, promotion etc.)

Embedding

The [institution_type] has reviewed its processes, and developed a policy to ensure public engagement is rewarded & recognised in formal and informal ways

The following questions relate to section 3: People

Dont Know

Don't know

Embryonic

Few if any opportunities exist for staff to get involved in public engagement, either informally or as part of their formal duties

Developing

There are opportunities for staff in a handful of [institution_subtype] to get involved in public engagement, either informally or as part of their formal duties

Gripping

There are structured opportunities for many staff members to get involved in public engagement; but not in all [institution_subtype]. There is a drive to expand opportunities to all

Embedding

All staff have the opportunity to get involved in public engagement, either informally or as part of their formal duties, and are encouraged and supported to do so

Dont Know

Don't know

Embryonic

Few opportunities exist for students (including research students) to get involved in public engagement, either informally, through volunteering programmes, or as part of the formal curriculum/ training

Developing

There are opportunities for students to get involved, but there is no coordinated approach to promoting and supporting these opportunities across the [institution_type]

Gripping

Many (but not all) students have the opportunity to get involved in public engagement and are encouraged and supported to do so. There is a drive to expand opportunities to all

Embedding

All students have the opportunity to get involved in public engagement, and are encouraged and supported to do so. The [institution_type] offers both formal and informal ways to recognize and reward their involvement

Dont Know

Don't know

Embryonic

Little or no attempt has been made to assess public need, or to support 'non traditional' groups in engaging with the [institution_type]

Developing

Some attempt has been made to analyse public need and interest; and to begin to tackle access issues to open up the [institution_type] and its activities to the public

Gripping

The [institution_type] has committed resources to assessing public need and interests, and to using this insight and feedback to inform its strategy and plans

Embedding

The [institution_type] has assessed need & committed resources to supporting a wide range of groups to access its facilities and activities, and to systematically seek their feedback and involvement.

4

The questions in this section are specifically for professional services and technical staff.

12345donít know
The findings of research
Areas for further research
Policy and regulatory issues relating to research
The wider social and ethical implications of research for society
The potential benefits of their work to individuals or society
The research process
Scientific uncertainty (if applicable)
The enjoyment and excitement of their subject
The relevance of their subject to everyday life
To raise awareness of career options in their subject

12345Don't knowN/A
The amount of public engagement activity undertaken by universities in the UK has increased
The quality of public engagement activities undertaken by universities in the UK has improved
Research funders increasingly support public engagement
The amount of public engagement activity undertaken by researchers at [institution_prefix_low] [institute] has increased
The quality of public engagement activities undertaken by [institute] has improved
[institution_prefix_cap] [institute] increasingly supports public engagement
[institution_prefix_cap] [institute] offers practical support for public engagement (e.g. training)
I am increasingly asked to support people to develop their public engagement work
My job has significantly changed in order to support staff or students to engage the public with their work

5

The following questions are specifically for researchers and research students.

Not at all importantNot very importantEqually importantFairly importantVery important

12345
The findings of your research
Areas for further research
Policy and regulatory issues relating to your research
The wider social and ethical implications of your research for society
The potential benefits of your work to individuals or society
The research process
Scientific uncertainty (if applicable)
The enjoyment and excitement of your subject
The relevance of your subject to everyday life
To raise awareness of career options in your subject

None in the last 12 monthsOnce2-3 times4-5 times6-10 timesMore than 10 times
Worked with teachers/schools
Participated in an institutional public open day
Given a public lecture, including being part of a panel
Taken part in a public dialogue event/debate
Been interviewed on radio
Been interviewed by a newspaper journalist
Written for the public (media, articles, books)
Engaged with policy-makers
Engaged with NGOs
Worked with museums, galleries, science centres, arts centres and other cultural centres
Judged competitions
Communicated via social or digital media (Facebook, Twitter, blogs, podcasts, YouTube, etc.) excluding marketing
Participated in a science, literary or arts festival or fair
Projects involving the public or patients as researchers (e.g. citizen science, participatory research)
Engaged via theatre, performance, film etc.
Worked with the public/patients' groups
Collaborated with the entertainment industry (e.g. games or broadcast companies)
Other informal public engagement events/talks (including e.g. sci bar, Pint of Science, cafť scientifique)

12345
Researchers who do a lot of public engagement are not well regarded by other researchers
Researchers have a moral duty to engage with the public about the social and ethical implications of their research
I don't think my research is interesting to the general public
I would be happy to take a public stance on the issues raised by my research
Engagement with the non-specialist public is best done by trained professionals and journalists
My research is too specialised to make much sense to the public
I feel confident in my public engagement skills
I would be happy to take part in a public engagement activity that was organised by someone else
There are no personal benefits for me in public engagement
Public engagement improves the quality of my research
There is enthusiasm from the public to learn more about research
I don't believe the public can add value to my research
My work has implications for society

12345Don't knowN/A
The amount of public engagement activity undertaken by universities has increased
The quality of public engagement activities undertaken by universities has improved
Research funders increasingly support public engagement
The amount of public engagement activity undertaken by researchers at [institution_prefix_low] [institution] has increased
The quality of public engagement activities undertaken by [institution_prefix_low] [institution] has improved
[institution_prefix_cap] [institution] increasingly supports public engagement
[institution_prefix_cap] [institution] offers practical support for public engagement (e.g. training)

6

These questions apply to all survey respondents.

7

Public engagement at [institution_prefix_low] [name of institution]

Please click submit to submit your survey. Please note, once you have submitted the form, you cannot make any changes.



Fields in red are required or have incorrect formatting!
You must pick one of the two options